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Safari 9.1

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Safari 9.1

Safari 9.1

What’s new Version 9.1:

 

  • Picture Element Support
  • iOS gesture events are now supported on Safari for OS X.
  • Fast-Tap on iOS
  • WebGL Rendering
  • Image Smoothing Quality for Canvas Rendering
  • CSS Enhancements

 

Fixes :

 

  • Multiple memory corruption issues were addressed through improved memory handling.
  • An issue existed where the text of a dialog included page-supplied text. This issue was addressed by no longer including that text.
  • An insufficient input validation issue existed in the handling of certain files. This was addressed through additional checks during file expansion.
  • A cookie storage issue existed in the Top Sites page. This issue was addressed through improved state management.
  • An issue existed in the handling of attachment URLs. This issue was addressed through improved URL handling.
  • Multiple memory corruption issues were addressed through improved memory handling.
  • A port redirection issue was addressed through additional port validation.
  • An issue existed in the parsing of geolocation requests. This was addressed through improved validation of the security origin for geolocation requests.

 

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Apple March Event 2016 Keynote

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Apple March 2016 Keynote

 

iPhone SE

iPhone SE

 

ipad pro 9.7

9.7 inch iPad

 

Apple iOs 9.3

Apple iOs 9.3

 

TvOS 9.2

TvOS 9.2

 

watchOS 2.2

watchOS 2.2

 

Apple Watch

Apple Watch low as $299

 

OS X El Capitan v10.11.4

OS X El Capitan v10.11.4

 

The OS X El Capitan v10.11.4 Update improves the stability, compatibility, and security of your Mac, and is recommended for all users.

OS X El Capitan v10.11.4 update :

Adds the ability to passcode-protect notes containing personal data in Notes
Adds the ability to sort notes alphabetically, by date created, or date modified in Notes
Adds the ability to import Evernote files into Notes
Adds support for sharing Live Photos between iOS and OS X via AirDrop and Messages
Addresses an issue that may cause RAW images to open slowly in Photos
Adds the ability for iBooks to store PDFs in iCloud, making them available across all your devices
Fixes an issue that prevented loading Twitter t.co links in Safari
Prevents JavaScript dialogs from blocking access to other webpages in Safari
Fixes an issue that prevented the VIPs mailbox from working with Gmail accounts
Fixes an issue that caused USB audio devices to disconnect
Improves the compatibility and reliability of Apple USB-C Multiport Adapters

OS X El Capitan v10.11.4 Enterprise content:

Fixes an issue that could cause a black screen after logging in as the root user
Fixes an issue that prevents using screen sharing to remotely click the Allow button or Always Allow button in Keychain Access
Fixes an issue that prevents Migration Assistant from opening when automatic login has been disabled using a configuration profile
Fixes an issue that prevents Mail from showing the date and time of certain Microsoft Exchange calendar events
Provides compatibility with the Cisco AnyConnect VPN client
Improves the reliability of connecting to a Personal Hotspot via Wi-Fi
For detailed information about the security content of this update, see Apple Security Updates.

 

iTunes 12.3.3

iTunes 12.3.3

 

Xcode 7.3

Xcode 7.3

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Apple Customer Letter

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(For history…)

 

February 16, 2016 A Message to Our Customers

The United States government has demanded that Apple take an unprecedented step which threatens the security of our customers. We oppose this order, which has implications far beyond the legal case at hand.

This moment calls for public discussion, and we want our customers and people around the country to understand what is at stake.

 

Answers to your questions about privacy and security

Why is Apple objecting to the government’s order?

The government asked a court to order Apple to create a unique version of iOS that would bypass security protections on the iPhone Lock screen. It would also add a completely new capability so that passcode tries could be entered electronically.

This has two important and dangerous implications:

First, the government would have us write an entirely new operating system for their use. They are asking Apple to remove security features and add a new ability to the operating system to attack iPhone encryption, allowing a passcode to be input electronically. This would make it easier to unlock an iPhone by “brute force,” trying thousands or millions of combinations with the speed of a modern computer.

We built strong security into the iPhone because people carry so much personal information on our phones today, and there are new data breaches every week affecting individuals, companies and governments. The passcode lock and requirement for manual entry of the passcode are at the heart of the safeguards we have built in to iOS. It would be wrong to intentionally weaken our products with a government-ordered backdoor. If we lose control of our data, we put both our privacy and our safety at risk.

Second, the order would set a legal precedent that would expand the powers of the government and we simply don’t know where that would lead us. Should the government be allowed to order us to create other capabilities for surveillance purposes, such as recording conversations or location tracking? This would set a very dangerous precedent.

Is it technically possible to do what the government has ordered?

Yes, it is certainly possible to create an entirely new operating system to undermine our security features as the government wants. But it’s something we believe is too dangerous to do. The only way to guarantee that such a powerful tool isn’t abused and doesn’t fall into the wrong hands is to never create it.

Could Apple build this operating system just once, for this iPhone, and never use it again?

The digital world is very different from the physical world. In the physical world you can destroy something and it’s gone. But in the digital world, the technique, once created, could be used over and over again, on any number of devices.

Law enforcement agents around the country have already said they have hundreds of iPhones they want Apple to unlock if the FBI wins this case. In the physical world, it would be the equivalent of a master key, capable of opening hundreds of millions of locks. Of course, Apple would do our best to protect that key, but in a world where all of our data is under constant threat, it would be relentlessly attacked by hackers and cybercriminals. As recent attacks on the IRS systems and countless other data breaches have shown, no one is immune to cyberattacks.

Again, we strongly believe the only way to guarantee that such a powerful tool isn’t abused and doesn’t fall into the wrong hands is to never create it.

Has Apple unlocked iPhones for law enforcement in the past?

No.

We regularly receive law enforcement requests for information about our customers and their Apple devices. In fact, we have a dedicated team that responds to these requests 24/7. We also provide guidelines on our website for law enforcement agencies so they know exactly what we are able to access and what legal authority we need to see before we can help them.

For devices running the iPhone operating systems prior to iOS 8 and under a lawful court order, we have extracted data from an iPhone.

We’ve built progressively stronger protections into our products with each new software release, including passcode-based data encryption, because cyberattacks have only become more frequent and more sophisticated. As a result of these stronger protections that require data encryption, we are no longer able to use the data extraction process on an iPhone running iOS 8 or later.

Hackers and cybercriminals are always looking for new ways to defeat our security, which is why we keep making it stronger.

The government says your objection appears to be based on concern for your business model and marketing strategy. Is that true?

Absolutely not. Nothing could be further from the truth. This is and always has been about our customers. We feel strongly that if we were to do what the government has asked of us — to create a backdoor to our products — not only is it unlawful, but it puts the vast majority of good and law abiding citizens, who rely on iPhone to protect their most personal and important data, at risk.

Is there any other way you can help the FBI?

We have done everything that’s both within our power and within the law to help in this case. As we’ve said, we have no sympathy for terrorists.

We provided all the information about the phone that we possessed. We also proactively offered advice on obtaining additional information. Even since the government’s order was issued, we are providing further suggestions after learning new information from the Justice Department’s filings.

One of the strongest suggestions we offered was that they pair the phone to a previously joined network, which would allow them to back up the phone and get the data they are now asking for. Unfortunately, we learned that while the attacker’s iPhone was in FBI custody the Apple ID password associated with the phone was changed. Changing this password meant the phone could no longer access iCloud services.

As the government has confirmed, we’ve handed over all the data we have, including a backup of the iPhone in question. But now they have asked us for information we simply do not have.

What should happen from here?

Our country has always been strongest when we come together. We feel the best way forward would be for the government to withdraw its demands under the All Writs Act and, as some in Congress have proposed, form a commission or other panel of experts on intelligence, technology, and civil liberties to discuss the implications for law enforcement, national security, privacy, and personal freedoms. Apple would gladly participate in such an effort.

The Need for Encryption

Smartphones, led by iPhone, have become an essential part of our lives. People use them to store an incredible amount of personal information, from our private conversations to our photos, our music, our notes, our calendars and contacts, our financial information and health data, even where we have been and where we are going.

All that information needs to be protected from hackers and criminals who want to access it, steal it, and use it without our knowledge or permission. Customers expect Apple and other technology companies to do everything in our power to protect their personal information, and at Apple we are deeply committed to safeguarding their data.

Compromising the security of our personal information can ultimately put our personal safety at risk. That is why encryption has become so important to all of us.

For many years, we have used encryption to protect our customers’ personal data because we believe it’s the only way to keep their information safe. We have even put that data out of our own reach, because we believe the contents of your iPhone are none of our business.

 

The San Bernardino Case

We were shocked and outraged by the deadly act of terrorism in San Bernardino last December. We mourn the loss of life and want justice for all those whose lives were affected. The FBI asked us for help in the days following the attack, and we have worked hard to support the government’s efforts to solve this horrible crime. We have no sympathy for terrorists.

When the FBI has requested data that’s in our possession, we have provided it. Apple complies with valid subpoenas and search warrants, as we have in the San Bernardino case. We have also made Apple engineers available to advise the FBI, and we’ve offered our best ideas on a number of investigative options at their disposal.

We have great respect for the professionals at the FBI, and we believe their intentions are good. Up to this point, we have done everything that is both within our power and within the law to help them. But now the U.S. government has asked us for something we simply do not have, and something we consider too dangerous to create. They have asked us to build a backdoor to the iPhone.

Specifically, the FBI wants us to make a new version of the iPhone operating system, circumventing several important security features, and install it on an iPhone recovered during the investigation. In the wrong hands, this software — which does not exist today — would have the potential to unlock any iPhone in someone’s physical possession.

The FBI may use different words to describe this tool, but make no mistake: Building a version of iOS that bypasses security in this way would undeniably create a backdoor. And while the government may argue that its use would be limited to this case, there is no way to guarantee such control.

 

The Threat to Data Security

Some would argue that building a backdoor for just one iPhone is a simple, clean-cut solution. But it ignores both the basics of digital security and the significance of what the government is demanding in this case.

In today’s digital world, the “key” to an encrypted system is a piece of information that unlocks the data, and it is only as secure as the protections around it. Once the information is known, or a way to bypass the code is revealed, the encryption can be defeated by anyone with that knowledge.

The government suggests this tool could only be used once, on one phone. But that’s simply not true. Once created, the technique could be used over and over again, on any number of devices. In the physical world, it would be the equivalent of a master key, capable of opening hundreds of millions of locks — from restaurants and banks to stores and homes. No reasonable person would find that acceptable.

The government is asking Apple to hack our own users and undermine decades of security advancements that protect our customers — including tens of millions of American citizens — from sophisticated hackers and cybercriminals. The same engineers who built strong encryption into the iPhone to protect our users would, ironically, be ordered to weaken those protections and make our users less safe.

We can find no precedent for an American company being forced to expose its customers to a greater risk of attack. For years, cryptologists and national security experts have been warning against weakening encryption. Doing so would hurt only the well-meaning and law-abiding citizens who rely on companies like Apple to protect their data. Criminals and bad actors will still encrypt, using tools that are readily available to them.

 

A Dangerous Precedent

Rather than asking for legislative action through Congress, the FBI is proposing an unprecedented use of the All Writs Act of 1789 to justify an expansion of its authority.

The government would have us remove security features and add new capabilities to the operating system, allowing a passcode to be input electronically. This would make it easier to unlock an iPhone by “brute force,” trying thousands or millions of combinations with the speed of a modern computer.

The implications of the government’s demands are chilling. If the government can use the All Writs Act to make it easier to unlock your iPhone, it would have the power to reach into anyone’s device to capture their data. The government could extend this breach of privacy and demand that Apple build surveillance software to intercept your messages, access your health records or financial data, track your location, or even access your phone’s microphone or camera without your knowledge.

Opposing this order is not something we take lightly. We feel we must speak up in the face of what we see as an overreach by the U.S. government.

We are challenging the FBI’s demands with the deepest respect for American democracy and a love of our country. We believe it would be in the best interest of everyone to step back and consider the implications.

While we believe the FBI’s intentions are good, it would be wrong for the government to force us to build a backdoor into our products. And ultimately, we fear that this demand would undermine the very freedoms and liberty our government is meant to protect.

Tim Cook

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Adobe Flash 20.0.0.235

What’s new inside Adobe Flash Version 20.0.0.235:

 

Fixed Issues

  • Flash Player fails to load the .SWF files that comprise much of com2Learn.com’s course content
  • Method URLLoader.load fails to load an xml file located within an MHT archive
  • Unloaded SWFs with Dialogs:Flash player hangs on clicking „browse dialog” link
  • usflashmap.com – Flash Player gets hang after clicking on the List tab
  • Embedded Flash objects stop working in SMART Notebook on Windows
  • The candidate window displayed at wrong position when input some CCJK characters on Windows 10 Edge Browser
  • Flash in 16:9 video resolution shows green strip (noise) on right of video window on Mac
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